Wage & Hour

  • April 24, 2024

    Solar Panel Co. Loses Calif. Appeal Over PAGA Arbitration

    A California appellate panel sided with a lower court as it ruled in a published opinion that a carveout in a home solar panel company's employment agreement did not require a former worker to arbitrate his individual Private Attorneys General Act claims, keeping his suit in court.

  • April 24, 2024

    Teva Sales Workers Score Conditional Cert. In OT Suit

    A New Jersey federal judge granted conditional certification to a collective of sales workers accusing pharmaceutical company Teva of unlawfully denying them overtime wages during an extended training program, saying the workers have enough in common to support certification.

  • April 23, 2024

    Ex-Banker Says HSBC Can't Blame Wage Policy On Manager

    A former HSBC Bank employee accusing the company of violating the federal wage and hour law by making employees work through lunch told a New York federal court the company's attorneys are trying to offload responsibility for their client's actions to a former manager.

  • April 23, 2024

    Divisive Cost Cap Deadline Looms For Calif. Healthcare Cos.

    California healthcare attorneys are preparing for the state's first cap on healthcare spending proposed by a new state office tasked with making care affordable. Industry leaders are sharply split on the viability of a proposed 3% target, which some say may ultimately do more harm than good for a state suffering from skyrocketing healthcare costs.

  • April 23, 2024

    Judge Overturns Biz's H-2B Ban, Blaming 'Gaslighting' Atty

    A U.S. Department of Labor administrative law judge overturned a decision to debar a Minnesota concessions stand company from the H-2B visa program over its failure to pay back wages and penalties, saying the small business's owner had only followed his attorney's advice — right into a legal disaster.

  • April 23, 2024

    Family Dollar Stiffs Assistant Managers On OT, Suit Says

    Family Dollar has not been paying its assistant managers overtime wages even though they regularly perform work off-the-clock like sorting money and cleaning the store, an ex-worker claimed in a proposed collective action filed in Tennessee federal court.

  • April 23, 2024

    Firefighters Want LA County's Early Win Bid Axed In Hotel Suit

    Los Angeles County firefighters urged a California federal judge to deny the county's bid for an early win in their suit alleging they weren't paid for time they spent quarantined in hotels during the COVID-19 pandemic, saying the motion attempts to use the courts as a "pawn to escape liability."

  • April 23, 2024

    Apple Settles Labor Fight Over COVID-19 Policy At Okla. Store

    An Apple Store in Oklahoma City has agreed to restore the sick time of workers who took off for COVID-19 since last August, pursuant to a recently announced settlement of an unfair labor practice charge filed by the workers' union.

  • April 23, 2024

    Virginia Contractor Owes $1.2M For Wage Violations

    A Virginia concrete contractor owes nearly $1.2 million in back wages, damages and fines for denying 81 workers their full pay, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Tuesday.

  • April 23, 2024

    Walmart Security Contractor Settles Guard's OT Suit

    A company that provides security for Walmart and an ex-worker told a Texas federal court they've agreed to end a lawsuit accusing the company of failing to pay guards overtime despite working 60 to 70 hours a week, and asked the court to close the case.

  • April 22, 2024

    Ex-Twitter Workers Can't Arbitrate Until Class Cert. Resolved

    A proposed class of former employees of Twitter, now known as X, cannot yet force the company to move forward with their various employment claims in arbitration, a California federal judge determined Monday, saying the issue of class certification needs to be decided first.

  • April 22, 2024

    Uber Can't Ditch All Drivers' Pay Claims, Ill. Judge Says

    Three Uber drivers claiming they're unlawfully classified as independent contractors and therefore paid illegally must arbitrate those proposed collective claims, but one driver who fought the issue in a previous case can pursue his claim in court, an Illinois federal judge said Monday.

  • April 22, 2024

    NY Becomes First State In US To Mandate Paid Prenatal Leave

    With its budget passage Saturday, New York became the first state in the U.S. to implement paid leave for pregnant employees to attend doctors' appointments, expanding its paid sick time requirements to create a new bank of up to 20 hours for this purpose.

  • April 22, 2024

    Quest Owes OT For Login Time, Ex-Call Center Agent Says

    Quest Diagnostics hasn't been paying its call center agents for off-the-clock work, such as the time it takes them to log into computer systems and shut down the programs, an ex-worker alleged in a proposed collective action filed Monday in New Jersey federal court.

  • April 22, 2024

    Cleaning Crew Says United Airlines Unit Didn't Pay All OT

    A United Airlines subsidiary providing cleaning services on planes failed to properly pay cabin workers for the nonscheduled overtime they worked, according to a proposed class action the company removed to Colorado federal court.

  • April 22, 2024

    Comcast Cable Installation Techs Drop FLSA Suit

    Former Comcast cable installation technicians asked a Pennsylvania federal judge Monday to formally dismiss a proposed class action alleging a subsidiary of the company failed to pay for work completed before and after their shifts and during meal breaks, saying they reached a settlement.

  • April 22, 2024

    Calif. High Court Says Pretrial Inmates Can't Get Min. Wage

    The California Supreme Court on Monday ruled that pretrial detainees who work while in jail are not entitled to minimum wage and overtime claims under California's labor law, finding the state's penal code permitting such work covers nonconvicted individuals.

  • April 22, 2024

    Ohio Transportation Co. To Pay $25K To End DOL OT Suit

    An Ohio transportation services company will pay $25,000 in back wages and liquidated damages to end a U.S. Department of Labor suit accusing it of stiffing workers on overtime wages, according to court papers filed Monday.

  • April 22, 2024

    Luxury Brand Seeks To Trim Workers' Recordkeeping Claims

    High-end fashion brand Comme Des Garçons asked a New York federal judge to toss recordkeeping claims that a proposed collective of employees brought as part of their suit alleging they were misclassified as managers and denied overtime wages, calling the claims derivative of the overtime allegations.

  • April 22, 2024

    DOL, Roofing Co. Ink $100K Deal To End OT Suit

    A Baltimore roofing company will pay $100,000 in back wages and liquidated damages to settle a U.S. Department of Labor suit alleging it denied workers overtime wages, according to court papers filed Monday.

  • April 22, 2024

    5 New State Employment Laws Passed This Year So Far

    State legislatures around the country are winding down legislative sessions that began in January, bringing newly enacted employment laws into effect in the coming months. From child labor to pay inequality to mandatory overtime, Law360 looks at five state laws that employers will have to comply with.

  • April 22, 2024

    Supreme Court Denies Amazon Bid To Review Arbitration Scope

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday denied Amazon's bid to review a Ninth Circuit decision on whether last-mile delivery drivers are exempt from the Federal Arbitration Act.

  • April 22, 2024

    Justices Won't Hear Bakery's Arbitration Exemption Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to again examine a carveout to a federal arbitration law for interstate transportation workers, in a case involving baked goods delivery drivers, after already issuing a decision in a similar case.

  • April 22, 2024

    Justices Won't Weigh If Domino's Drivers Arbitration-Exempt

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday passed on reviewing whether Domino's Pizza truck drivers are interstate transportation workers who are exempt from federal arbitration requirements, declining to pave the way for a ruling that could have expanded or narrowed the arbitration carveout.

  • April 19, 2024

    Uber, Lyft Ask Justices To Review Calif. Arbitration 'Loophole'

    Uber Technologies and Lyft Inc. asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review a California appellate court's decision rejecting their efforts to force into arbitration coordinated litigation alleging they misclassified drivers as independent contractors, saying the Golden State is trying to "create a loophole" in the Federal Arbitration Act.

Expert Analysis

  • How To Prepare As Employee Data Reporting Deadlines Near

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    As filing deadlines approach, government contractors and private companies alike should familiarize themselves with recent changes to federal and California employee data reporting requirements and think strategically about registration of affirmative action plans to minimize the risk of being audited, say Christopher Durham and Zev Grumet-Morris at Duane Morris.

  • The Practical Effects Of Justices' Arbitration Exemption Ruling

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Bissonnette v. LePage Bakeries, that a transportation worker need not work in the transportation industry to be exempt from the Federal Arbitration Act, may negatively affect employers' efforts to mitigate class action risk via arbitration agreement enforcement, say Charles Schoenwetter and Eric Olson at Bowman and Brooke.

  • New Wash. Laws Employers Should Pay Attention To

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    The Washington Legislature ended its session last month after passing substantial laws that should prompt employers to spring into action — including a broadened equal pay law to cover classes beyond gender, narrowed sick leave payment requirements for construction workers and protections for grocery workers after a merger, say Hannah Ard and Alayna Piwonski at Lane Powell.

  • AI In Accounting Raises OT Exemption Questions

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    A recent surge in the use of artificial intelligence in accounting work calls into question whether professionals in the industry can argue they are no longer overtime exempt under the Fair Labor Standards Act, highlighting how technology could test the limits of the law for a variety of professions, say Bradford Kelley at Littler and Stephen Malone at Peloton Interactive.

  • Eye On Compliance: Employee Social Media Privacy In NY

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    A New York law that recently took effect restricts employers' ability to access the personal social media accounts of employees and job applicants, signifying an increasing awareness of the need to balance employers' interests with worker privacy and free speech rights, says Madjeen Garcon-Bonneau at Wilson Elser.

  • Draft Pay Equity Rule May Pose Contractor Compliance Snags

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    The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council's recently proposed rule that would prohibit government contractors from requesting certain job applicants' salary history seems simple on the surface, but achieving compliance will be a nuanced affair for many contractors who must also adhere to state and local pay transparency laws, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • Where 9th Circ. Lowe's Ruling Leaves PAGA Jurisprudence

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    Leah Kennedy and Carolyn Wheeler at Katz Banks discuss the legal landscape and controlling precedent around the Private Attorneys General Act that led to the Ninth Circuit's Johnson v. Lowe's decision last month on individual PAGA wage claims, and explore the open questions that it leaves.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: March Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses four notable circuit court decisions on topics from consumer fraud to employment — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including coercive communications with putative class members and Article III standing at the class certification stage.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • EEOC Case Reminds That Men Can Also Claim Pay Bias

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    The Maryland State Highway Administration recently settled U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission claims that a male employee was paid less than his female colleagues, highlighting why employers should not focus on a particular protected class when it comes to assessing pay bias risk, say Barbara Grandjean and Audrey Merkel at Husch Blackwell.

  • 2026 World Cup: Companies Face Labor Challenges And More

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    Companies sponsoring or otherwise involved with the 2026 FIFA World Cup — hosted jointly by the U.S., Canada and Mexico — should be proactive in preparing to navigate many legal considerations in immigration, labor management and multijurisdictional workforces surrounding the event, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Avoiding Jurisdictional Risks From Execs' Remote Work

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    Following a California federal court's recent decision in Evans v. Cardlytics — where the case was remanded to state court because the company’s executives worked remotely in California — there are several steps employers can take to ensure they will not be exposed to unfavored jurisdictions, says Eric Fox at Quarles & Brady.

  • Eye On Compliance: Workplace March Madness Pools

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    With March Madness set to begin in a few weeks, employers should recognize that workplace sports betting is technically illegal, keeping federal and state gambling laws in mind when determining whether they will permit ever-popular bracket pools, says Laura Stutz at Wilson Elser.